Eskimos is a "best bet for new parents."

Booklist

Starred Review

Hopgood "writes from a place of respectful, cosmopolitan curiosity – a refreshing break from the often judgmental tone of parenting books and blogs."

Boston Globe Review

How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm

Lucky Girl is "a great book... to move you"

Good Housekeeping Magazine

Lucky Girl, May 2009 Book Pick

"A pleasure to read...This absorbing assemblage of perspectives will help widen our own."

BookPage

Top Pick for Lifestyles Jan. 12, 2012

In Eskimos, Hopgood "provides substantial food for thought, the kind that any new, in-tune mother would appreciate."

Washington Post Review

How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm

"Hopgood is a likable narrator whose life embodies a fascinating Sliding Doors-type what-if scenario."

Elle Magazine

Lucky Girl, June 2009 Book Pick of the Month

Lucky Girl The Book of the year

 

Publication Date: APRIL 28, 2009

Price: $23.95

Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill

A Division of Workman Publishing

225 Varick Street, New York, NY 10014

www.algonquin.com

Mei-Ling Hopgood was an all-American girl. She grew up in the Midwest, was a high school pom pom girl, went to college, and became a reporter for a Michigan newspaper. She wasn’t really curious about her Asian roots, though she knew she was adopted. Then one day, when she’s in her 20s, her birth family from Taiwan comes calling, literally, on the phone, on the computer, by fax—in a language she doesn’t understand. They want to meet her; they want her to return to them.

 

As her sisters and parents pull her into their lives with boisterous affection, claiming her as one of their own, Mei-Ling falls in love with them. But this unexpected reunion has a price, as she learns things she never wanted to know about why she was given away. Ever the enthusiastic journalist, Mei-Ling turns her investigative skills to her own family, trying to uncover the devastating secrets that haunt her family to this day, and to understand the choices of her birth mother.

 

Lucky Girl journeys into the rich Chinese culture—its magnificent sights, war-torn history, and sumptuous foods—while it reveals the personal suffering wrought by the country’s tightly-held traditions. Mei-Ling finds that although both her Chinese and American families have shaped her identity, in the end it’s up to her to figure out who she is. Hers is a tale of love and loss, frustration, hilarity, deep sadness and great discovery that helps her understand the meaning of family.